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PostSubject: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Wed May 18, 2011 12:08 pm

Link here http://www.mcremo.com/fa.htm

Watch program with actor Charlton Heston http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oGqPc6poS4
alien
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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Wed May 18, 2011 12:27 pm

Got the email on the post. Yes I have heard Michael on Coast To Coast and did watch the program sometime ago on YouTube.
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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Wed May 18, 2011 2:01 pm

I think it was like Peter Jennings where it was one of the last projects he did. It does say something when they lend their names to it. alien alien alien alien
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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Thu May 19, 2011 11:04 am

Cool stuff cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers cheers

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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Mon May 23, 2011 11:00 pm

Never knew about it. I guess to see what happens you got to see the movie knowing. study
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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Thu May 26, 2011 10:37 pm

Michael Cremo is a member of the History of Science Society, the World Archeological Congress, the Philosophy of Science Association, the European Association of Archaeologists and a research associate in history and philosophy of science for the Bhaktivedanta Institute. After receiving a scholarship to study International Affairs at George Washington University, Michael began to study the ancient histories of India known as the Vedas. In this way, he has broadened his academic knowledge with spirituality from the Eastern tradition.

Michael is on the cutting edge of science and culture issues. In the course of a few months time he might be found on pilgrimage to sacred sites in India, appearing on a national television show in the United States or another country, lecturing at a mainstream science conference, or speaking to an alternative science gathering. As he crosses disciplinary and cultural boundaries, he presents to his various audiences a compelling case for negotiating a new consensus on the nature of reality.

(From Coast To Coast)
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Tad Sherman

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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Thu May 26, 2011 10:40 pm

S.A. Felton did a great review of Mr. Cremo's book. Below is the review.

I read with great interest the shorter version of "Forbidden
Archaeology," "The Hidden History of the Human Race," and with even
more interest "Forbidden Archaeology's Impact," a large book of
reviews/criticisms of the author's monumental first book along with
Mr. Cremo's counter-countercritisms. I am definitely one of those who
thinks that science has gotten way out of hand when it comes to rejecting
anything beyond the physical. The author is among the leading anti-scientism
voices in the world. "Human Devolution" was written to answer critics who
"demanded" that he be more "scientific" and provide an alternative to
Darwinian evolution, rather than just criticizing it. As he comes from a
Vedic perspective, "Human Devolution" purports to be from that point of view.
The title encapsulates the Eastern belief that to occupy a physical body,
a soul "devolves" into matter; we are not physical-only, soulless beings.
As a reviewer, one has to decide if the author actually presents a
coherent model to counter Darwinian evolution. With regrets I think that
Mr. Cremo does not present such a model, certainly not a scientific model,
with clear data points that lead to clear conclusions, and in fact he
definitely argues for not only a "default" God of the gaps when the
neo-Darwinian and Big Bang models are found wanting, but the "gap approach"
is the main approach to prove the validity of the Vedic model. For example,
on p. 239, after rightfully dismissing a quantum mechanical approach to
consciousness and non-locality, in comes the Vedic model: everything
emanates from God, the "Supersoul" is all knowing, etc. Fine, but too
vague for me, certainly not a detailed model, and I will at least credit
scientists, who for the most part are very conservative and will usually
present good data points.

I can agree with Mr. Cremo that spiritual "models" are given by Divine
revelation, but we must at least admit that they are often quite nebulous,
if not overwhelming. To the point, in the final chapter of the book there
is an all-too brief discussion of some of the time scales in the Vedic
teachings. We learn about the Day/Night of Brahmin (4.32 billion years),
composed of manvantaras and yugas, but little "filling in the gaps." And
the real kicker is in the prior chapter; while presenting a very fine
discussion of the 6 crucial constants in the universe which are so finely
tuned it could not possibly be a matter of chance, we read that the "ultimate"
number of the Vedic model is actually 311 trillion years, the "breath of Maha
Vishnu!" Such numbers make Big Bang cosmology look young, but again I yearn
for more of the details of the reasons for these cycles, also what goes on
in the cosmic Hierarchy, in the physical world(s), during these cycles, rather than
the detachment of incomprehensibly large numbers.

The book would have better been entitled "Forbidden Anthropology and
Suppressed Scientific Research Into The Paranormal." There are staggering
amounts of details on comparative anthropology, particularly as it relates
to common mythologies about a Supreme God, a separate Creator God, and
paranormal beliefs among a wide variety of cultures. This is more or less
presented in conjunction with a topic Cremo covers with great success:
the integrity and open-mindedness of scientists from Newton and Kepler
(Middle Ages) to 19th century pioneers Wallace (co-founder of evolutionary
theory) and Crookes, who either believed in a higher God force behind the
material world, or themselves did extensive research into the paranormal.
The author devotes a lot of pages to Wallace's writings late in his life,
writings you will never see in contemporary scientific discussions.

Yet these details are to me another problem with the book, an
incredible number of pages in a number of sections covering mediums
and seances. Certainly there is some amazing data here, but surely
more effort could have been spent on clarifying the Vedic model than
bringing out yet another seance or medium. As for the discussion on
comparative mythologies, I can only say that at times I found the
details interesting, at other times not, and what is really lacking is
an overall consistency about what is being covered!

A real irony in "Human Devolution" is the author's great ability to
summarize scientific theories and concepts when he so chooses. I am not
that well-versed in genetics, paleontology, and cosmology (to name a
few disciplines!), yet I much enjoyed his discussions in these areas,
but let me be clear, I am not saying he is completely correct either.
Ch. 3 is a good presentation of possible proof that non-human species
(insects and plants) existed long before the Darwinists would allow.
Ch. 4, covering genes and molecular evolution, is clear and interesting,
as is the discussion in Ch. 10 on Sir Martin Rees's "Just Six Numbers,"
mentioned above.

"Human Devolution" has many interesting references, including obscure
though relevant books and articles, and that is to the credit of the author
and his research assistant(s). In the end I would recommend "Human Devolution,"
but be ready to skim!!
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PostSubject: Re: FORBIDDON ARCHEOLOGY   Thu May 26, 2011 11:31 pm

Thanks for the review Tad. Very Happy
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